Rescue centre owner says unwanted pets are "non-stop"

Abandoned dogs issue is soaring

Abandoned dogs issue is soaring

First published in News

THE number of dogs being abandoned across the Tendring district is increasing dramatically, according to a rescue centre owner.

Maureen Taylor, of Mistley Place Park, helps rehome dogs which are left at her door.

In the past six months, she said the number of stray dogs left at the park had been “non-stop”.

“It is terrible,” she said. “We seem to have so many terrier crosses and also Staffies and Staffie crosses."

If the dogs are not claimed, Mrs Taylor helps them put on weight and get over nerves, before getting them spayed and vaccinated and rehoming them.

“Part of it is down to people not realising what a responsibility an animal is,” she said.

“But also some of it is people losing their home and moving into rented accommodation where dogs are not allowed. People haven’t got a lot of money and can’t afford to feed them.”

Comments (5)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

5:22pm Thu 10 Apr 14

Jack222 says...

Put them down if they are not quickly rehomed. We have more important charities.
Put them down if they are not quickly rehomed. We have more important charities. Jack222
  • Score: -1

11:00pm Thu 10 Apr 14

Misty4 says...

Jack222 wrote:
Put them down if they are not quickly rehomed. We have more important charities.
I agree, Jack222. So much effort is expended on unwanted dogs, some of which turn up at rescue centres because of peeing, pooping and biting issues. There are not enough homes for these animals and the only solution is to euthanise most of them. And as you say, there are much worthier charities.
[quote][p][bold]Jack222[/bold] wrote: Put them down if they are not quickly rehomed. We have more important charities.[/p][/quote]I agree, Jack222. So much effort is expended on unwanted dogs, some of which turn up at rescue centres because of peeing, pooping and biting issues. There are not enough homes for these animals and the only solution is to euthanise most of them. And as you say, there are much worthier charities. Misty4
  • Score: 1

3:51pm Fri 11 Apr 14

Snowthorne says...

Everyone has their own favourite charities so the idea of putting down poor dogs through no fault of their own is not a workable one.
If someone has a charity they give to regularly they will not automatically give to a charity others deem more worthwhile.
Personal choice after all.
Also there are no 'bad' dogs only 'very bad' owners!!
Everyone has their own favourite charities so the idea of putting down poor dogs through no fault of their own is not a workable one. If someone has a charity they give to regularly they will not automatically give to a charity others deem more worthwhile. Personal choice after all. Also there are no 'bad' dogs only 'very bad' owners!! Snowthorne
  • Score: 1

4:29pm Fri 11 Apr 14

multitasker says...

Jack222 you are a nasty sounding person. It is the owner;s faults not the dogs. Animal charities are worthwhile causes so if you don't like the article being about animals then don't read it and don't comment.
Jack222 you are a nasty sounding person. It is the owner;s faults not the dogs. Animal charities are worthwhile causes so if you don't like the article being about animals then don't read it and don't comment. multitasker
  • Score: 1

2:46pm Sat 12 Apr 14

Misty4 says...

Jack 222 and Snowthorne: It is only partially true that it is the owner's fault, not the dog's. Some dogs, such as the so-called bully breeds, were selectively bred to bring out their tenacious traits. You cannot change a dog's genes, no matter how good the owner. That is why, when a pit bull attacks, the owner is often at a loss to explain it because it was supposedly so soft and gentle. Unfortunately the bully breed dogs, because of their tenaciousness and potential for viciousness, fall into the hands of people who are often the least well equipped to be good dog owners. Their habit of backyard breeding for pocket money keeps the rescue centres well supplied with the sort of dogs that are least likely to make good pets. Supply and demand alone dictate that these dogs should be euthanised, which is not a big deal for the dogs as, unlike humans, they don't know what is about to happen and therefore do not feel fear. Handled properly, it is the most humane option in terms of limiting the large number of unwanted dogs.
Jack 222 and Snowthorne: It is only partially true that it is the owner's fault, not the dog's. Some dogs, such as the so-called bully breeds, were selectively bred to bring out their tenacious traits. You cannot change a dog's genes, no matter how good the owner. That is why, when a pit bull attacks, the owner is often at a loss to explain it because it was supposedly so soft and gentle. Unfortunately the bully breed dogs, because of their tenaciousness and potential for viciousness, fall into the hands of people who are often the least well equipped to be good dog owners. Their habit of backyard breeding for pocket money keeps the rescue centres well supplied with the sort of dogs that are least likely to make good pets. Supply and demand alone dictate that these dogs should be euthanised, which is not a big deal for the dogs as, unlike humans, they don't know what is about to happen and therefore do not feel fear. Handled properly, it is the most humane option in terms of limiting the large number of unwanted dogs. Misty4
  • Score: 2

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree